Out for a Walk

Walk 3After a couple of rainy days last week, and an enforced extended period at my desk, I really felt in need of an airing, and it needed to be more than a walk around the estate (as in housing estate – I don’t own a country pile)! Husband never says no to a walk so we took a drive out to the other side of town. We have a few different parks in and around the town, the largest of which is Arrow Valley Park which cover 900 acres.  Created during the 1970s, the park is a haven for wildlife and its 29 acre lake is popular for fishing and sailing. The park takes its name from the River Arrow which runs through it.  As well as woods and wetlands, activities on offer include orienteering routes, an art trail, several children’s playgrounds, a BMX track, and equestrian and walking routes.  Despite all this activity, it is in fact quite possible to take a quiet, leisurely walk alongside the lake and through the adjoining wooded area.  There are numerous routes into the park and we chose to park about a mile away and walk the long footpath which brought us close to the lakeside. It was a route which neither of us have walked before and we found it really pleasant.Walk 4

Today we went again. Elder son and family came over and met us there. Son had called a couple of weeks ago with eldest grandson but this was the first time I’d seen the little ones for fifteen weeks!  I was so excited today and even though it was much cooler and windy, it stayed dry. The little boys waved and by the time they’d walked across the car park I was in tears. I’d missed them so much. They couldn’t use the play equipment but we walked around the entire lake and they found feathers, sticks and daisies.

During both walks we stayed well away from other people, turning away if they had to pass us, even if they were 2 meters away. Every time we have been out we’ve crossed roads or changed route to avoid a close encounter. For more than three months we have avoided living a normal life and done everything we can to contribute to the greater good of minimising the virus risk, so it makes me seethe with anger to see scenes like this one in Dorset at the end of last week where the ‘I’m above being told what to do’ brigade brazenly ignore the advice and please themselves thus endangering the rest of the country as they return to their home towns.   The Prime Minister appealed to common sense but the problem there is that they clearly don’t have any.Dorset beach

16 comments

  1. How wonderful to be with your grandchildren again xxxx Sadly, I did know people who visited other people’s homes for dinner, and who drove miles to go for a walk. In NZ we were asked to not drive around and to walk close to home, and stay in our own homes, no visiting. Now that the restrictions are greatly lifted here, I really don’t want to waste my friendship time on those who quite clearly think that they are special.

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    • I can identify with that, Ratnamurti. We have neighbours opposite who have constantly flouted the rules, and even more so now the restrictions have been relaxed.

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  2. I’m glad you were able to go for a walk and meet with your son and grandsons. I saw pictures of that crowded beach on the news the other night. There are plenty of people like that, on this side of the pond, too, and they’ve managed to make it a political thing as well as a First Amendment Right. They are the reason why I am continuing to stay at home!

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    • Best place to be, Bless! I’m a sociable person who loves to be out and about but I honestly haven’t found it too hard to confined to the house so much. I think I’ve surprised myself.

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  3. The park sounds lovely and so good to see family again. I was in tears too when I saw little GD after 12 weeks. I try to avoid people as much as possible because the majority just do not keep their distance. They don’t seem to realize it is for their own good.

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    • It’s crazy. I just can’t believe how much stupidity is out there. Fortunately I was able to see two of the other grandchildren more often because they leave nearby – I’d stand at the top of their garden steps and they stood in the doorway. we were able to talk and ‘send hugs’, but it’s not a substitute for cuddles. I don’t like crowds at the best of times so it suits me fine to keep away from busy places. There were quite a lot of people at the park but it is so spread out that there were lots of large open spaces with no-one in them.

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  4. Oh, Eloise, it must have been so wonderful to see them after all this time, I’m not surprised there were tears. I’m misting up just reading about it.
    The footage of the crowds left me speechless. At the best of times I can’t imagine there would be any pleasure in spending time on such a busy beach, but to be taking such a risk to do so is just crazy.

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    • Bless you, Jules. I did think I might shed a tear or two but it was rather more than that! Husband said the boys looked very puzzled (and even more so when he told them that nanny was crying because she was happy’.

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  5. Your walk looked idyllic and lovely to be with family too.. those people on beaches have no ideas how they are endangering everyone else.

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    • I’ve never been so long without seeing them! I feel so sorry for people who have grandchildren living abroad because long absences would be the norm. I don’t know how I’d cope with that.

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  6. Fortunately there are plenty of places, even beaches, in Dorset that are devoid of people, I can walk a few miles without meeting anyone. Glad you got to see your family. Sarah D.

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    • My daughter has found a small beach not far from Cromer and has visited a couple of times recently. There has been only a handful of people. It’s one of the less attractive beaches in the area but it suits them fine under the circumstances. Thanks for joining me at thisissixty.

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  7. What a lovely park and how lovely to meet up with the family after all our self-isolation, Eloise. Like you, we have kept away from people, crossed roads to avoid people, not gone in a shop since before the 23rd March, and wiped everything that came into the house with Milton sterilizing fluid or a mild bleach solution and constantly washed our hands. Those people flocking to beaches are selfish beyond belief and stupid, too. Sadly there common sense, as I’ve said before (often) isn’t common to all.
    Margaret P

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    • It was so lovely to see them. I’d forgotten how much energy those little boys have; they dart about so quickly. I was exhausted afterwards and all I did was walk! I’m still wiping everything that comes in to the house and wonder when I’ll feel confident enough to stop….not for a while, I think.

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  8. Yes – some people have no common sense !
    I don’t mind them putting themselves into dangerous situations – but do object to them putting others at risk.
    As a shielder I will not be going out in the near future due to the stupid behaviour of others.
    Most people are careful but it only takes a few to ruin it for others.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hello Mag, thank you for joining in. Yes, it’s so wrong to put others at risk. Sorry to hear that you have had to shield . I think many others will be like you and continue to shield for the time being.

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